Institute Staff

Head of Institute - Dr. Scott Ury


A scholar of Jewish and East European histories and cultures, Scott Ury received his PhD at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. His scholarship lies at the intersection of Jewish, east European and urban histories and focuses on the impact of urbanization on inter-group relations. 

His most recent book is Barricades and Banners: The Revolution of 1905 and the Transformation of Warsaw Jewry (Stanford University Press, 2012). Based on archival and published sources in Hebrew, Polish, Russian and Yiddish from archives and libraries in America, Israel and Poland, Barricades and Banners examines the impact of urbanization on relations between Poles and Jews during a period of much social and political turmoil, the Revolution of 1905. Barricades and Banners was awarded the Reginald Zelnik Book Prize for Outstanding Monograph on Russia, Eastern Europe or Eurasia in the field of history by the Association for Slavic, East European and Eurasian Studies (ASEEES).  The book also received a commendation for the Fraenkel Prize in Contemporary History from the Wiener Library for the Study of the Holocaust and Genocide, London.

In addition to Barricades and Banners, he is also co-editor of Jews and their Neighbours in Eastern Europe since 1750 (Littman, 2011), as well as a volume on Cosmopolitanism, Nationalism and the Jews of East Central Europe (Routledge, 2014).

As a Senior Lecturer in Tel Aviv University’s Department of Jewish History, Dr. Ury teaches graduate and undergraduate courses on modern Jewish history, the history of antisemitism and urban history.



Head of the Project for the Study of Tolerance and Intolerance in the Middle East - Dr. Esther Webman

Esty Webman

A senior research fellow at the Dayan Center for Middle Eastern and African Studies and the Stephen Roth
Institute for the Study of Antisemitism and Racism in Tel Aviv University. She is the head of the Project for the Study of Tolerance and Intolerance in the Middle East, and editorial board member of 
Sharqiyya, Journal of Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies, and Moreshet for the Study of Antisemitism and the Holocaust
. Her research is focused on Arab discourse analysis, Modern Islamic movements, Muslim-Jewish Relations, particularly Arab Antisemitism and Arab perceptions of the Holocaust.

She is the editor of The Global Impact of a Myth – The Protocols of the Elders of Zion (London, 2011). Her book, From Empathy to Denial: Arab Responses to the Holocaust, co-authored with Meir Litvak, was the recipient of the Washington Institute for Near East Policy's book prize for 2010.

Dr. Webman teaches at the department of Middle Eastern history courses on "Jewish communities in the Middle East between Arab nationalism and Zionism", as well as "Nationalism, Islamism and Antisemitism in the Middle East" to undergraduate students.



Research assistant, Project on Tolerance and Intolerance - 
 Yarden Ben Dor

Yarden Ben Dor


Yarden Ben-Dor is an MA student in Tel Aviv University’s Department of Middle Eastern and African History. His M.A thesis examines the development of Iranian nationalism towards ethnic miniroties during the first decade of the Islamic Republic of Iran. 



Research Assistant - Eitan Rom

Eitan Rom

Eitan Rom is an MA student in Tel Aviv University's Department of Jewish History. His MA thesis examines the efforts by different branches of the Kibbutz movement to rescue Jewish children during World War II, in particular the case of the "Tehran Children".




Research Assistant - Yarden Amir

Yarden Amir

Yarden Amir is an MA candidate in the research program of the Department of Jewish History at Tel Aviv University. His research compares the construction of Antisemitism as a historical category between two national Jewish historiographers, Simon Dubnow and Ben Zion Dinur. This research aims to spotlight the subjectivity of antisemitism when history is read as literature. Yarden holds a BA in Jewish History and a BA in Hebrew Culture from Tel Aviv University, as well as a teaching diploma for the subject of Jewish